Marketing Match: Facebook Groups and Pages

Misunderstood and underutilized, Facebook Groups can be very a  useful complement to a Facebook for many businesses and organizations. You’re familiar with Facebook Pages, of course, which serve more as a public, outward face of a business or organization. You add Likes to the page to grow your audience and share content of interest to […]

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Misunderstood and underutilized, Facebook Groups can be very a  useful complement to a Facebook for many businesses and organizations.

You’re familiar with Facebook Pages, of course, which serve more as a public, outward face of a business or organization. You add Likes to the page to grow your audience and share content of interest to your customers to nurture their business.

Facebook Groups work a bit differently, and are often used for more inward-facing goals with an audience already familiar with the brand.

Consider some advantages of Facebook Groups:

Greater Visibility at No Cost – Members of a group are more likely to see your content in their news feed than from a page – especially if the group has a lot of people who are Facebook friends with each other.

Conversations/Meetings – Groups lend themselves better to active, ongoing conversations about specific topics of interest. You can also schedule a discussion or meeting, similar to Google hangout.

Document Sharing – You can share documents (like a PDF or Word doc) within the group, where you can’t do this on brand page.

Privacy Settings – Unlike a page which is open to the public, groups can be open, closed (joining and seeing content requires admin approval), or even secret (where the group itself, membership, and all content is reserved only for those an admin expressly invites to the group).

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Brainstorm about how a Facebook Group might work for you with these examples we’ve developed for clients:

  • An Insider’s Club, where a designer could share projects they’re working on or new products in advance to a core audience, including influential bloggers and loyal customers of the brand.
  • An industry conference invites people into a closed group, where only those who have registered may see advance content about the event. Members also have the opportunity to meet and network online among themselves, adding extra, long-term value to their conference participation.
  • A regional nonprofit group with networking events can promote the events to a core audience that is much more likely to see the events in their news feeds. This allows the Facebook ad budget to be used to reach new people to attract to the organization’s Facebook page.
  • A secret Facebook Group to help a hospital connect with HIV+ youth they aid where the you are spending their time – on Facebook. The hospital can keep their group informed about group activities together, special resources available to members, all while maintaining necessary privacy for all group members.

Facebook Groups offer brands a no- and low-cost way to connect with core audiences they have. They can work very symbiotically with your Facebook Page to help you serve different audiences more effectively. How might a group work for your brand?

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